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Some Authors of Entertaining Parables

Authors Who Entertain and Edify. Here are a just a few of the many authors I have enjoyed, who have successfully combined entertainment and serious ideas in their novels—which is what I aspire to do. You'll notice that all of these are serious, literary science fiction works. That is why, among my thrillers on this site, I feel compelled to mention one of my own SF novels, Time Train. The following is only a partial list.

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus (1816 at first telling) is a science fiction classic about the potential for evil in technology applied without moral forethought.

H. G. Wells' The Time Machine (1895) is a science fiction classic about the evolution of humans into a scary future society.

Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1931) is a science fiction classic about the dangers of genetic engineering and other loose cannon technology in (what else?) a frightening futuristic dystopia.

Ayn Rand's Anthem (1938) is a science fiction classic about a future dark age and a person's self-discovery.

George Orwell's 1984 (written 1948) is a science fiction classic about yet another dystopian future, in which bureaucratic tyrants daily rewrite history and truth in the form of 'newspeak.' Notice that Orwell's title is a transposed form of 1948.

Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 (1953) is a science fiction classic about government book burners in a tyrannical future society.

William Golding's Lord of the Flies (1954) and The Inheritors (1955) are powerful social commentaries, which helped earn him a Nobel Prize for Literature.

Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 (1966) is my favorite novel of all time. It takes place in a metaphor world mirroring our own reality. I mention it in the blurbage for my own wildly dystopian novel YANAPOP. So who really controls our world?

Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Robot Sheep? (1968) is a science fiction classic about yet another dystopian future. It became the basis for Ridley Scott's classic 1982 SF movie Blade Runner.

The List Goes On… You get the point. Interestingly, publishers afraid of a certain social stigma about imagination have tended to relabel stories like these as Literature, leaving the so-called scientifiction or science fiction field (which we prefer to call SF) as a collection of silly melodramas and cynical exploitation flicks that people tend to refer to as 'sigh-fie' with visible, sheepish embarrassment. Please, let's get real.

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cover of latest Progressive Thriller by San Diego Author John T. Cullen

Take a look at my own SF nightmare of similar scope:

John Argo's Time Train (2012) is my own SF novel (published under my SF pseudonym) about a future Amerika ruled by a sectarian tyrant called The Great Shepherd. Surprisingly visionary about the looming nightmare called Trump, this tyrant has built a great wall around the United States, leaving a nightmarish feudal society cut off from the rest of the world, and from the truth about a kinder, gentler reality beyond Amerika's machine guns, attack dogs, and spotlights. More info on this same site.